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We could get used to this. #necprepontour #ypoontour #necmusic ...

Sat, 2015-06-20 08:33


We could get used to this. #necprepontour #ypoontour #necmusic (at Myvatn Naturebath)

Day 1: Gorgeous weather and new Icelandic friends! #necmusic...

Sat, 2015-06-20 08:26


Day 1: Gorgeous weather and new Icelandic friends! #necmusic #ypoontour #necprepontour (at Akureyri Iceland)

And we’re off! #necprepontour #ypoontour #necmusic (at On...

Sat, 2015-06-20 08:24


And we’re off! #necprepontour #ypoontour #necmusic (at On the Road, Iceland)

We made it! Let the fun begin #necmusic #ypoontour...

Fri, 2015-06-19 20:18


We made it! Let the fun begin #necmusic #ypoontour #necprepontour (at Keflavik International Airport Liefur Eiriksson Terminal)

Introducing our iPadio channel!

Tue, 2015-06-16 14:37
Introducing our iPadio channel!:

“Hi, I’m Steven Karidoyanes. This iPadio channel chronicles the June 2015 tour of the New England Conservatory Youth Symphony. We’re traveling to Ireland and Northern Ireland, with performances in Galway, Derry and Dublin. Stop by this channel every once in a while and follow our trip.”

YS Leaves for Ireland in 8 days!

Mon, 2015-06-15 10:20


YS Leaves for Ireland in 8 days!

YPO Tour art!

Thu, 2015-06-11 14:42


YPO Tour art!

Get to know Corey Seapy, conducting and clarinet

Thu, 2015-06-11 14:02

What advice would you offer to young performers?

Listen to yourself very carefully and never say “I can’t.” Be disciplined,   patient, and use a metronome. Practice slowly first. Don’t be afraid to take chances and make emotional connections. Make every sound expressive, unless the composer tells you otherwise. If you don’t love it, do something else. If you do love it, do it as much and as meaningfully as you can.

Apart from music, what other activities do you find enriching in your life?

I like spending time with family and friends, skiing, being outdoors, and reading.

How would you describe the tone of your instrument/voice?

Limitless! That’s the best part about conducting.

Who has been your biggest source of inspiration throughout your education/career?

Claudio Abbado

If you could choose one career outside of music, what would it be?

A teacher of some sort. Perhaps a ski instructor.

What is your favorite genre of literature?  What’s the most memorable thing you’ve read in the past year?

Nonfiction. “Corresponding with Carlos” by Charles Barber.

What have you been listening to most recently?

Sibelius, The Punch Brothers, Radiohead, Elgar, Madeleine Peyroux, and Sonny Stitt.

Do you have any pets at home?  If so, where is your favorite place to take them for a walk?

Our guinea pigs don’t get out much. Bixby and Maestro are scared of anything that moves, including each other.

Some thoughts from Anne Howarth, horn faculty

Thu, 2015-06-11 12:39

What advice would you offer to young performers?

Find your authentic voice, and go after opportunities that feel right for you. There is more than one way to have music in your life. While a traditional orchestra or opera or string quartet may be right for some people, they might not be right for everyone. Maybe a mix of opportunities is what’s right for you. Or maybe something completely different. Every orchestra only needs one concertmaster, but the world needs a variety of musicians sharing their gifts in a variety of ways.

Apart from music, what other activities do you find enriching in your life?

Travelling, vegetable gardening, and spending time with my 1-year-old black cat, Junko. I love to see the world from other people’s perspectives, and traveling (even to other towns around New England) lets me do that. Vegetable gardening puts me in touch with the elements of nature and helps me practice letting go of outcomes. I plant the seeds, fertilize them and water them. After that, it’s out of my hands. I had never owned a cat before Junko, and she forces me to slow down. Just when I want to get up, she’ll crawl into my lap or up on my shoulder and settle in for a nap. As a result, I do much more meditating and pre-performance visualization then I’ve ever done before! It’s been great for my horn playing.

What have you been listening to most recently?

Benjamin Britten’s Serenade for tenor, horn, and strings, Op. 31.
I had the honor of performing it as faculty soloist with the Tufts Chamber Orchestra at the Granoff Music Center in Medford on March 31 at 8 pm and at Symphony Space in New York City on April 19. Several well-known horn players have recorded it, and I’m always curious to hear other horn players’ interpretations. The writing is terrific, and it is great fun to play.

Do you have any pets at home? If so, where is your favorite place to take them for a walk?

I think Junko would freak out if I took her for a walk! She’s definitely an indoor, city cat.

Some thoughts from Anne Howarth, horn faculty

Tue, 2015-05-26 16:24

 What advice would you offer to young performers?

Find your authentic voice, and go after opportunities that feel right for you. There is more than one way to have music in your life. While a traditional orchestra or opera or string quartet may be right for some people, they might not be right for everyone. Maybe a mix of opportunities is what’s right for you. Or maybe something completely different. Every orchestra only needs one concertmaster, but the world needs a variety of musicians sharing their gifts in a variety of ways.

Apart from music, what other activities do you find enriching in your life?

Travelling, vegetable gardening, and spending time with my 1-year-old black cat, Junko. I love to see the world from other people’s perspectives, and traveling (even to other towns around New England) lets me do that. Vegetable gardening puts me in touch with the elements of nature and helps me practice letting go of outcomes. I plant the seeds, fertilize them and water them. After that, it’s out of my hands. I had never owned a cat before Junko, and she forces me to slow down. Just when I want to get up, she’ll crawl into my lap or up on my shoulder and settle in for a nap. As a result, I do much more meditating and pre-performance visualization then I’ve ever done before! It’s been great for my horn playing.

What have you been listening to most recently?

Benjamin Britten’s Serenade for tenor, horn, and strings, Op. 31.
I had the honor of performing it as faculty soloist with the Tufts Chamber Orchestra at the Granoff Music Center in Medford on March 31 at 8 pm and at Symphony Space in New York City on April 19. Several well-known horn players have recorded it, and I’m always curious to hear other horn players’ interpretations. The writing is terrific, and it is great fun to play.

Do you have any pets at home? If so, where is your favorite place to take them for a walk?

I think Junko would freak out if I took her for a walk! She’s definitely an indoor, city cat.


Get to know Corey Seapy, conducting & clarinet

Sat, 2015-05-02 13:00

What advice would you offer to young performers?

Listen to yourself very carefully and never say “I can’t.” Be disciplined,  patient, and use a metronome. Practice slowly first. Don’t be afraid to take chances and make emotional connections. Make every sound expressive, unless the composer tells you otherwise. If you don’t love it, do something else. If you do love it, do it as much and as meaningfully as you can.

Apart from music, what other activities do you find enriching in your life?

I like spending time with family and friends, skiing, being outdoors, and reading.

How would you describe the tone of your instrument/voice?

Limitless! That’s the best part about conducting.

Who has been your biggest source of inspiration throughout your education/career?

Claudio Abbado

If you could choose one career outside of music, what would it be?

A teacher of some sort. Perhaps a ski instructor.

What is your favorite genre of literature?  What’s the most memorable thing you’ve read in the past year?

Nonfiction. “Corresponding with Carlos” by Charles Barber.

What have you been listening to most recently?

Sibelius, The Punch Brothers, Radiohead, Elgar, Madeleine Peyroux, and Sonny Stitt.

Do you have any pets at home?  If so, where is your favorite place to take them for a walk?

Our guinea pigs don’t get out much. Bixby and Maestro are scared of anything that moves, including each other.


Getting to know faculty member, Randy Wong, bassist, music-in-education

Thu, 2015-04-23 09:24

What advice would you offer to young performers?

Build your fundamental skills to virtuosic degrees. Don’t just listen to music, but transcribe what you hear. Start a journal of interesting orchestration techniques… then transcribe them. Study solfege like it’s your first language. Learn a favorite piece by transposing it to a different key. But above all, never give up and don’t put yourself down. Music can be a lifelong passion, and you don’t have to “get it” right away… You have your whole life to improve.

Apart from music, what other activities do you find enriching in your life?

Community service and volunteerism. There are many non-profits out there who rely on volunteers to carry out their basic services. However, there’s usually a shortage of people who actually reach out and offer to help, particularly with basic or menial tasks. (Everyone wants to do the “important stuff”). I like to be one of the people that helps at the most basic levels.

Who has been your biggest source of inspiration throughout your education/career?

Musically: My peers, particularly at NEC. There’s a tremendous source of creativity and life here. From students to faculty, it’s incredible how much dedication there is collectively to our craft. Many people that I perform professionally with now, I originally met in high school and college. It’s very inspiring to be able to learn, perform, and grow together.

Non-Musically: My parents, grandparents, and wife are super sources of inspiration. Both of my grandfathers worked continually into late stages of their life (mid 80s and early 90s). My parents never let me give up my dreams of success. And my wife is a very dedicated violinist herself.

If you could choose one career outside of music, what would it be?

I’ve always been curious about dance. I never took any Western dance classes (only Hawaiian hula, which is a requirement when you grow up in Hawaii), but I’ve always been fascinated by movement and choreography. There’s so much music inherent in dance, and vice-versa, so it would probably be a good fit for my interests and personality.

What is your favorite genre of literature?  What’s the most memorable thing you’ve read in the past year?

I haven’t gotten into any fiction in a very long time. The last books I read were “How the States Got Their Shape,” which is mostly American history, and then a mathematics book, “The Joy of X.” That said, I’m trying to get into Ernest Hemingway, and am starting with his short stories.

What have you been listening to most recently?

Classical: the new “Balance Problems” album from yMusic; Pierre Fournier’s Bach cello suites; music of composer Michael-Thomas Foumai; Joe Foley’s album “Nightsongs” with Bonnie Anderson.

Non-Classical: Music recently released by my NEC peers.
“Shaken by a Low Sound” album by Crooked Still; “Lock My Heart” album by Heather Masse and Dick Hyman; “Nuestro Tango” by Natalie Fernandez; “Secret Love” album by Sara Leib; and “Ugandan Suite” by Felipe Salles; “Center Song” album by Steve Treseler; “Cockpit” album by Bootyjuice.

Do you have any pets at home?  If so, where is your favorite place to take them for a walk?

I have two “budgie” birds. They don’t walk much, but they’re also not so great at flying, so basically they glide around my music room.


Get to know NEC Prep Faculty, Barbara Winchester, voice

Fri, 2015-04-03 15:48

What advice would you offer to young performers?

Learn how to practice–I hear so many young performers playing a phrase wrongly and who keep practicing over and over that bad habit, take a difficult passage very slowly
and starting with the end of a piece instead of always the beginning.

Apart from music, what other activities do you find enriching in your life?

My husband and I have taken tango lessons for years and are planning a trip to Argentina. I enjoy interior design, art, especially African American artists, Mexican artists like Tamayo, Rivera and Siequieros, and I like reading, especially biographies.

How would you describe the tone of your instrument/voice?

I don’t go for a single tone for all pieces, I like a variety of colors. My sound is rich and unforced.

Who has been your biggest source of inspiration throughout your education/career?

My teachers, my father, for his work ethic and my husband, who is a composer.

If you could choose one career outside of music, what would it be?

A doctor, specifically a pediatrician.

What is your favorite genre of literature?  What’s the most memorable thing you’ve read in the past year?

I love poetry.  After all, it’s my business! I think that students should memorize poems.  When I was in a bilingual (French) school, I could recite many by heart.

I loved “The Giver” and I am constantly reading.

What have you been listening to most recently?

Old tapes and Diana Krall.


Junior/Senior MYWE Concert Interview with Diego Bacigalupe!

Fri, 2015-03-13 16:35

Today we had the chance to talk with one of Senior MYWE’s musicians, Diego Bacigalupe! He gave us some insight on some of the pieces that will be played as well as some of the difficulties that came in preparation of the Junior and Senior MYWE combined concert.

What have been the challenges of this program and how have you grown as a musician from these challenges?

The most challenging part of preparing Sunday’s program is mastering the music with the limited rehearsal time. We only meet as a group once a week, making it difficult for us to learn a lot of music. This has forced us to prepare diligently for rehearsals, focus during rehearsal, listen and adjust to each others playing. Even with limited and scattered rehearsal time, we can efficiently learn music to perform.

What are you most looking forward to about this performance?

I’m most looking forward to hearing Jr. MYWE play their music and play with us. Live wind ensemble performances don’t happen often so hearing another group play similar music is a rewarding experience. I also can’t wait to perform with Jr. MYWE because the combined group will sound amazing. When I was in Jr. MYWE, I would have loved the opportunity to play with Sr. MYWE.

Pick your favorite piece on the program. What does that piece mean to you?

My favorite piece on the program is Eric Whitacre’s October; I love the colors he evokes. This piece is special to me and many others in Sr. MYWE because we played it back when we were in Jr. MYWE. Playing it again after we’ve developed into more mature musicians is an amazing experience.  The fact that we’re playing this piece in a combined Jr./Sr. MYWE concert brings it full circle.

Is there an experience with music that inspired you to be a musician?

When I was 7 years old, I remember visiting my grandfather while my family was in Spain. He played jazz cornet with his friends in a band and I remember watching him perform for people on the street as a hobby. I thought it was so cool that he could do this for fun with his friends and entertain strangers on the street so from then on, I always wanted to be a musician.

What is your favorite piece of music?

I don’t have an all-time favorite piece because I love so much music, but right now my favorite pieces are Respighi’s Pines of Rome, and Chabrier’s España.



YOU PLAY BACH YOUR WAY, AND I'LL PLAY HIM HIS WAY. WANDA LANDOWSKA