Generally, students are awarded one credit for each hour of class time.
Exceptions are made for studio, ensemble, and a small number of classes.
For complete information as to courses offered in the current year, students
should consult the schedule of course offerings available each semester in the
Registrar’s Office. Courses numbered 100 through 499 are undergraduate
level; courses numbered 500 through 999 are graduate level. Course numbers
preceded by a “»” are typically offered each academic year. Course numbers
followed by a “T” are taught to mixed classes of undergraduates and graduates.
Undergraduate students may register for graduate-level courses with the
instructor’s permission. Courses followed by a “*” are repeatable for credit.
Courses followed by a “**” are repeatable for credit if the topic has changed
(permission from Academic Advisor required).

MUSIC THEORY

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM

»THYU 093 – Fundamentals of Music Theory
Focuses on the rudiments of music (scales, intervals and chords). The course consists of three tracks. The first track continues through the entire semester, and helps students develop their understanding of fundamentals through notation, ear training, and keyboard harmony. A second track contains the same material as the first track, but at an accelerated pace; it lasts for seven weeks. A third track, also lasting seven weeks, focuses primarily on ear training and keyboard skills. Students who are enrolled for the entire semester will earn two credits; students enrolled in the seven-week tracks will earn one credit. For all tracks, proficiency is evaluated at the end of the course through a departmental exam; the student must pass this exam before continuing on to Tonal Practice I or Solfège II.
(1 or 2 credits – credits do not fulfill graduation requirements) Faculty  

»THYU 101 – Solfège I
Stresses knowledge of tonality, as represented by scales and scale-degree functions. Topics include treble and bass clefs; melodies in major and minor keys; rhythms in standard meters; modulations to the dominant, relative major and relative minor, and their function in small forms. Materials include Bach chorales and Mozart symphonies. Students must demonstrate sight-singing competency in the departmental examination to pass the course. (3 credits) Faculty  

»THYU 102 – Solfège II
Topics include note identification in treble, bass, and alto clefs; melodies in major and minor keys; increasingly remote modulations; complex rhythmic subdivision and syncopation; small forms; score reading. Materials include Bach chorales, classical symphonies, other vocal and instrumental works. Students must demonstrate sight-singing competency in the departmental examination to pass the course. Continuation of THYU 101. Prerequisite: THYU 101. (3 credits) Faculty  

»THYU 106 – Tonal Practice I
Focuses on diatonic tonal language of the Common Practice period, with emphasis on the phrase as the vehicle for musical motion. Students study the role of underlying harmonic functions (tonic, predominant, and dominant) within the phrase, and explore how the contrapuntal relationship between the soprano and bass contributes to directed motion towards the cadence. The course also includes (1) the study of counterpoint (first and second species) to sensitize students to the relationship between melodic lines, and (2) an introduction to formal analysis, with emphasis on phrases, periods, and sentences. Topics are introduced and/or reinforced through ear training. Prerequisite: passing Fundamentals of Music Theory exam.
(3 credits) Faculty  

»THYU 201 – Solfège III
Topics include note reading and transposition using five clefs (treble, bass, soprano, alto, and tenor), rhythms using changing time signatures and complex subdivisions, tonal melodies featuring rapid modulation, and score reading. Materials include Renaissance vocal music, Bach chorales in open score, Beethoven symphonies, and other instrumental scores with transposing instruments. Students must demonstrate sightsinging competency in the departmental examination to pass the course. Prerequisite: THYU 102 and THYU 106. (3 credits) Faculty  

»THYU 202 – Solfège IV
Topics include note reading and transposition (using up to seven clefs), advanced rhythmic subdivision, syncopation, conducting, chromatic and atonal melodies, and score reading. In the spring semester, each Solfège IV section focuses on a particular topic or body of repertoire, with general emphasis on 20th-century music. Students must demonstrate sightsinging competency in the departmental examination to pass the course. Prerequisite: THYU 201 and THYU 207. (3 credits) Faculty  

»THYU 207 – Tonal Practice II
Focuses on writing, hearing, and analyzing chromatic harmony and modulations to closely related keys; analysis of binary and ternary forms; introduction to sonata form. Prerequisites: THYU 106 and THYU 102. (3 credits) Faculty  

»THYU 208 – Tonal Practice III
Studies typical chromatic progressions and large-scale tonal designs representative of the later Common Practice period; analysis of larger works, with emphasis on works in sonata form. Continuation of THYU 207. Prerequisites: THYU 207 and THYU 201. (3 credits) Faculty 

Please Note: For the following courses [except Solfège for Singers (THYU 425) and Advanced Solfège (THYU 406T)], Jazz Studies and Contemporary Improvisation students may satisfy the prerequisite requirements through completion of THYU 202 or CI 283T or JS 483T, and THYU 208.  

THYU 305 - 20th Century Compositional Practices
Theoretical study of the music of three composers active in the first half of the 20th century: Bartok, Stravinsky, and Debussy. Format of study is three-phased: analyses of given works, student composition exercises modeled on works analyzed, and revisiting of original works with renewed understandings gained from modeling. Though this is not a “composition” course, student models will be performed in class and in a public concert at the end of the term. Prerequisite: THYU 202, 208. (3 credits) Sandler  

THYU 307 – Extended Tonality
Explores the 19th-century expansion of harmonic practice through analysis of works from Schubert to Debussy. Prerequisite: THYU 202, 208. (3 credits) Stein  

THYU 309 – Topics in Early 20th-Century Music
Explores aspects of the evolution from conventional 18th- and 19th-century harmonic and formal practices to their 20th-century manifestations. The approach and emphasis will depend on the individual faculty member. Prerequisite: THYU 202, 208. (3 credits**) Faculty  

THYU 315 – Analysis and Performance of 19th-Century Lieder
Examines both German Romantic poetry and the musical settings of Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Mahler, and others. As the Lied genre developed, the poetic text seemed to encourage innovation and daring in virtually every aspect of musical composition. Study of the poetic text will lead to greater understanding of all aspects of the musical setting: harmony, tonality, melody, motive, meter, rhythm, articulation through texture, register, timbre, etc. Where possible, students will perform various Lieder in the classroom. Prerequisite: THYU 202, 208. (3 credits) Stein  

THYU 327 – Performers’ Introduction to Schenkerian Analysis
Introduces facets of Schenker’s analytical process most pertinent to performers: how a work is shaped by a counterpoint of melody and bass; how harmonic flow and melodic shape involve prolongation; how melodic lines evolve; and how motivic elements recur. Demonstrates the application to performance through student performances informed by analysis. Prerequisite: THYU 202, 208. (3 credits) Stein  

»THYU 329 – Order and Chaos in Music since 1945
Study of the development of musical language after 1945 includes dramatic shifts in the concepts of melody, harmony, tonality, and non-tonal languages, meter, rhythm, form and expressivity. Composers include Carter, Messiaen, Cage, Babbitt, Ligeti, Boulez, Stockhausen, Reich, and Glass. Prerequisite: THYU 202, 208. (3 credits) Miljkovic  

THYU 361 – The String Quartets of Beethoven
Studies Beethoven’s String Quartets, with special attention to formal design, harmonic structure, motivic development, and texture, as well as the implications of these for performance. (3 credits) Graybill  

THYU 362 – Bach’s Music for Solo String Instruments
Explores aspects of style, compositional technique, and performance practice in the instrumental music of Johann Sebastian Bach, focussing on his Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin, BWV 1001-1006, and his Suites for solo cello, BWV 1007-1012. Specific aspects to be studied include musical texture, harmony, counterpoint, polyphonic melody, rhythm, form, and ornamentation. Students’ work will involve listening, analysis, and reading assignments, as well as compositional exercises modeled on Bach’s music. As a mid-term project, each student will write a dance movement in the style of Bach (for any melodic instrument), which will be performed and discussed in class. Analytical exam at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: THYU 202,208. (3 credits) Truniger  

THYU 368 – The American Art Song and 20th Century Tonality
Theoretical study of songs by American Composers active in the 20th century, namely: Barber, Ives, Larsen, Musto and Rorem. Format of study includes: study of analytical methods needed for making musical sense of the songs, study of various styles that co-mingle in the songs, background on the poets/lyricists, and hands-on analysis of select pieces. Prerequisite: THYU 202,208. (3 credits) Sandler  

»THYU 371 – American Experimental Music Since 1960 This is conceived as an intense, “hands on” course, emphasizing score reading, composing, and class performances. The course explores American experimental music from the early 1960s to the present and its close ties with plastic art, film, literature, and theater, as well as with musical traditions from around the world. Composers to be studied in class include Cage, Feldman, Young, Rzewsky, Brown, Monk, Oliveros, Curran and Zorn, among others. Throughout the semester, students will become acquainted with many resources for new music, including journals, festivals, web forums and performance spaces. Prerequisite: THYU 202,208. (3 credits) Miljkovic  

THYU 372 – Music Modernism and Thereafter This course addresses the multi-faceted phenomenon of modernism from an analytical perspective. It examines composers and works from the Second Viennese School, the French-Russian School, German Expressionism, and the frequently neglected “indigenous” and experimentalist modernist movements that appear outside Western Europe. It also introduces and assesses a variety of analytical models that are applied to music of the era. The repertory addressed in the context of this course covers a period of time from the early 1920s until today, with primary focus on the era before World War II. It includes the work of composers from Western Europe and the European periphery, the former Soviet Union, East Asia and the Americas. To provide a broader understanding of the phenomenon of modernism in its totality, the course also addresses developments in visual arts, literature and architecture, attempting to draw parallels between developments in these fields and music. Prerequisite: THYU 202,208. (3 credits) Minakakis  

»THYU 406T – Advanced Solfège
Expands sight-singing skills to include a broad range of musical styles and application to contemporary literature. Topics include further investigation of reading skills with respect to note patterns, transpositions, interval studies, complex rhythms, complex tonal systems, and score reading from an advanced perspective. Continuation of THYU 202. Prerequisite: THYU 202, 208 or instructor’s permission. (3 credits) Buys  

»THYU 411T – 16th-Century Counterpoint
Analyzes Lassus’s canons and two-voice motets; composing compositions in the style. Readings in Pietro Aaron, Aldrich, Cook, and Wittkower. Prerequisite: THYU 202, 208. (3 credits) Davidson  

»THYU 412T – 16th-Century Counterpoint
Analyzes composition of motets and mass movements in three or four voices. Readings from Zarlino. Continuation of THYU 411T. Prerequisite: THYU 411T. (3 credits) Davidson  

THYU 413T – Invention in the Style of Bach
Studies Baroque counterpoint with special attention to Johann Sebastian Bach’s keyboard inventions. Aspects of style and compositional technique are explored through analysis, listening, and performance, as well as through constant writing of contrapuntal exercises modeled on Bach’s music. As a final project, each student will compose a two-voice invention (for keyboard or two melodic instruments), which will be performed and discussed in class. Prerequisite: THYU 202, 208. (3 credits) Truniger  

THYU 414T – Fugue in the Style of Bach
Examines more complex contrapuntal forms, such as canons and fugues, in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. Course work includes compositional exercises, as well as reading, analysis, and listening assignments. As a final project, each student will compose a three-voice fugue (for keyboard or three melodic instruments), which will be discussed and performed in class. Prerequisite: THYU 202, 208. (3 credits) Truniger  

THYU 415T – Byzantine Music
This course focuses on the ecclesiastic (sacred) and secular music initiated and developed before, during and after the East Roman (Byzantine) Empire. The course addresses issues on the music theory and practice of the Greek Antiquity, the origins of the Byzantine music notation (parasemantics), the ways the Ancient Greek music theory, notation, tuning system, and vocal practices laid the foundation for the Byzantine and Demotic music. Course assignments and tests include weekly singing in Byzantine solfège and tuning; listening quizzes; a composition of a hymn in the Byzantine style; selected readings; a transcription project of a hymn or a demotic song that includes detailed notation (western) and analysis; and an analytical term paper followed by a presentation during the Finals. Prerequisite: THYU 202, 208 (3 credits) Faculty  

»THYU 417T – Microtonal Composition and Performance
Students learn to hear, sing and play intervals as small as a twelfth tone, and discover a thrilling new world of melody and harmony through compositional and improvisational exercises. Students are performing their own short works by semester’s end. To put these pursuits in context, we also take a look at early explorations with microtonality from the turn of the twentieth century through the 1950s (Carrillo, Ives, Wyschnegradsky, Partch and others). Listening to recordings, studying scores and reading essays, we try to answer the question “Why microtones?” Prerequisite: THYU 202, 208. (3 credits) Werntz  

THYU 418T – Microtonal Composition and Performance
As writing and improvisational exercises become more extensive, our exploration of style, esthetics and practical matters becomes more involved. A recital at semester’s end concludes the year. Our study of recordings and scores also continues, focusing on the period from the 1950s to the present. Continuation of THYU 417T. Prerequisite: 417T. (3 credits) Werntz  

THYU 419T – The Music of Xenakis and Ligeti
The work of Xenakis and Ligeti is of seminal importance to contemporary music. Both outsiders to the Franco-German post-1945 avant-garde, their unique vision established them as two of the most formidable explorers of music in Europe and throughout the world. While their personal idioms are highly distinct, both Xenakis and Ligeti frequently addressed common compositional issues. From their 1950s critique of serialism, to their later interest in complex patterns, their development was often triggered by identical impulses. This course examines aspects of Xenakis’ and Ligeti’s work through the prism of the solutions both composers provided to the same problems. Prerequisite: THYU 202, 208. (3 credits) Minakakis  

THYU 425T – Solfege Through Vocal Music
This course helps students to advance solfege skills through the study of vocal music performed both a cappella and with instrumental ensembles. It is designed to review, reinforce and expand sight singing and ear training skills. Prerequisite: THYU 202. (3 credits) Scripp  

THYU 442 – Music in Ghana, West Africa: A Theoretical Look
An engagement of select traditional and contemporary musics created in Ghana, West Africa. The course addresses: reading, writing, performing, singing and analyzing music from different perspectives. In particular, students will learn basic drumming patterns of Agbadza and Kpanlogo, make transcriptions, learn of the various ways that theorists have sought to describe the music of Africa and the controversies that surround that work, and explore the music of a select number of contemporary Ghanaian composers who integrate their Western art music training with their indigenous culture. (3 credits) Sandler 

 

GRADUATE CURRICULUM

»THYG 082 – Principles of Harmony and Form
Designed to aid graduate students with deficiencies in harmony and formal analysis. The course, which includes both written and aural components, covers diatonic and chromatic harmony as well as principles of form (including the study of formal units such as phrases, periods, binary and ternary forms, and sonata form). (0 credit) Faculty  

»THYG 511T – 16th-Century Counterpoint
Analyzes Lassus’s canons and two-voice motets; compositions in the style. Readings in Pietro Aaron, Aldrich, Cooke, and Wittkower. (2 credits) Davidson  

»THYG 512T – 16th-Century Counterpoint
Analyzes composition of motets and mass movements in three or four voices. Readings from Zarlino. Continuation of THYG 511T. Prerequisite: THYG 511T or instructor’s permission. (2 credits) Davidson  

THYG 513T – Invention in the Style of Bach
Studies Baroque counterpoint with special attention to Johann Sebastian Bach’s keyboard inventions. Aspects of style and compositional technique are explored through analysis, listening, and performance, as well as through constant writing of contrapuntal exercises modeled on Bach’s music. As a final project, each student will compose a two-voice invention (for keyboard or two melodic instruments), which will be performed and discussed in class. (2 credits) Truniger  

THYG 514T – Fugue in the Style of Bach
Examines more complex contrapuntal forms, such as canons and fugues, in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. Course work includes compositional exercises, as well as reading, analysis, and listening assignments. As a final project, each student will compose a three-voice fugue (for keyboard or three melodic instruments), which will be discussed and performed in class. (2 credits) Truniger  

THYG 515T – Byzantine Music
This course focuses on the ecclesiastic (sacred) and secular music initiated and developed before, during and after the East Roman (Byzantine) Empire. The course addresses issues on the music theory and practice of the Greek Antiquity, the origins of the Byzantine music notation (parasemantics), the ways the Ancient Greek music theory, notation, tuning system, and vocal practices laid the foundation for the Byzantine and Demotic music. Course assignments and tests include weekly singing in Byzantine solfège and tuning; listening quizzes; a composition of a hymn in the Byzantine style; selected readings; a transcription project of a hymn or a demotic song that includes detailed notation (western) and analysis; and an analytical term paper followed by a presentation during the Finals. (2 credits) Faculty  

»THYG 517T – Microtonal Composition and Performance
Students learn to hear, sing and play intervals as small as a twelfth tone, and discover a thrilling new world of melody and harmony through compositional and improvisational exercises. Students are performing their own short works by semester’s end. To put these pursuits in context, we also take a look at early explorations with microtonality from the turn of the twentieth century through the 1950s* (Carrillo, Ives, Wyschnegradsky, Partch and others). Listening to recordings, studying scores and reading essays, we try to answer the question “Why microtones?” (2 credits) Werntz  

THYG 518T – Microtonal Composition and Performance
As writing and improvisational exercises become more extensive, our exploration of style, esthetics and practical matters becomes more involved. A recital at semester’s end concludes the year. Our study of recordings and scores also continues, focusing on the period from the 1950s to the present. Continuation of THYG 517T. Prerequisite: THYG 517T. (2 credits) Werntz  

THYG 519T – The Music of Xenakis and Ligeti
The work of Xenakis and Ligeti is of seminal importance to contemporary music. Both outsiders to the Franco-German post-1945 avant-garde, their unique vision established them as two of the most formidable explorers of music in Europe and throughout the world. While their personal idioms are highly distinct, both Xenakis and Ligeti frequently addressed common compositional issues. From their 1950s critique of serialism, to their later interest in complex patterns, their development was often triggered by identical impulses. This course examines aspects of Xenakis’ and Ligeti’s work through the prism of the solutions both composers provided to the same problems. (2 credits) Minakakis  

THYG 537 – Teaching Music Theory: Methods and Materials
This course contains three basic components: (1) an overview of pedagogical philosophies and their implications for pedagogy and theory curricula; (2) a survey of pedagogical materials in the areas of fundamentals, sightsinging and ear training, harmony and voice-leading, and counterpoint; and (3) the development of teaching skills for the music theory classroom. The coursework includes readings, assignments, an annotated bibliography of selected texts and journal articles, and a small research project that explores issues covered in the course. Students will also develop basic pedagogical skills for teaching a music theory class, and will be asked to do at least one teaching demonstration during the semester. Prerequisite: 1 MM Theory Elective. (2 credits) Graybill, Davidson  

THYG 548 – Contrapuntal Principles and Practice: Bach to Present
Explores the evolution of contrapuntal practice and its underlying theoretical principles from the Baroque period up to the late 20th century. Music to be examined includes works by Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Bartok, Webern, and Carter. Students will deepen their understanding of diverse contrapuntal approaches through constant writing of compositional exercises, as well as through analysis, listening, and performance. Additional insight will be gained from theoretical texts by Schenker, Salzer/Schachter, Schoenberg, Seeger, and Krenek. Topics are to include tonal counterpoint, imitation procedures, dissonant counterpoint, serial counterpoint, and rhythmic stratification. (2 credits) Truniger  

THYG 551 – Compositional Practice: Medieval to Bach
Compositional experience for students who plan a career that includes teaching, theory, or composing. Composition, and criticism of others’ compositions, using a variety of historical, cultural, and theoretical approaches, based on Cogan and Escot’s Sonic Design: Practice and Problems. Critical review of counterpoint, harmony, and composition texts. (2 credits) Escot  

THYG 552 – Compositional Practice: Bach to the Moderns
Continuation of THYG 551. (2 credits) Escot  

»THYG 553 – Schenkerian Analysis and Performance: Introduction
Heinrich Schenker’s seminal theories of tonality and analysis and their influence on musical hearing, thinking, and performance. Theoretical, aural, and performance study of his treatment of diminution, voice-leading, counterpoint, harmony, and motive, including his methods of graphic display, in excerpts and short compositions primarily from Bach through Brahms. Focus on keyboard literature, along with selected chamber and vocal examples. (2 credits) Zaritsky  

THYG 555 – Psychophysical Analysis Ia: Tone Color Analysis (Instrumental)
Introduces the scientific analysis of sound. Analysis, including computer spectrographs, of the sounds of musical instruments and their combinations, and of the ways sonic qualities are chosen by composers and performers to shape and color musical contexts and works. Sonic design in music of different periods and cultures; relationship of tone color to other parameters and to visual color. Text: Cogan, New Images of Musical Sound. (2 credits) Cogan

THYG 556 – Psychophysical Analysis Ib: Tone Color Analysis (Vocal)
Analysis, including computer spectrographs, of the sounds of voices, languages, and their combinations, and of the ways vocal-linguistic properties color whole musical contexts and works. Vocal-linguistic music of different periods and cultures; performance comparisons; relationship to instrumental color; and theories of linguistic phonology. Text: Cogan, New Images of Musical Sound. (2 credits) Cogan  

THYG 557 – Psychophysical Analysis II: Space-Time Design
Theories of musical space and time (rhythm, dimensions, proportion), with attention to diverse musical practices, and to scientific analysis, including computer spectrographs, of sound and time. Combines relevant ideas of information theory, linguistics, and the history and philosophy of science and art. Presents musical works from diverse cultures and periods. (2 credits) Cogan  

THYG 558 – Advance Sonic Analysis
Hands-on practice in spectrographic analysis of instruments, voices and entire sonic contexts using available computer technology; development of theories of tone color and vocal-instrumental sound. Open to a small number of qualified students with instructor’s permission. (2 credits) Cogan  

»THYG 561 – Advanced Ear Training: Music of Bach through Brahms
Intensive practice in perception and performance of advanced melodic and tonal motions; linear and multilinear formations; rhythmic subdivisions; harmonic and contrapuntal textures; chromaticism and modulation. Based on Gestalt pedagogy of Jersild’s Ear Training. Dictation; prepared and sight-singing; aural analysis; semester project. Vocal and instrumental music from Baroque, Classical, and Romantic periods – especially by Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, and Wolf. (2 credits) Zaritzky  

»THYG 562 – Advanced Ear Training: Music of Stravinsky through Ligeti
Hearing and singing 20th-century idioms. Intensive practice in perception and performance of rhythm, interval, scale, and tone-set formations. Based on Gestalt pedagogy of Edlund’s Modus Novus. Dictation, prepared and sight-singing, aural analysis; semester project. Music of European and American 20th-century composers. (2 credits) Zaritzky  

»THYG 563 – Poetics of Simple Mathematics in Music
Introduces the application of mathematical ideas and structures to musical composition and theory. Selected topics in statistics, set theory, probability, nonlinear phenomena, proportional theory, fractals, and geometry as they apply to music from earliest to modern times. (Mathematical expertise is not a prerequisite.) (2 credits) Escot  

THYG 564 – Ambiguity in 18th- and 19th-century Music
Focuses on various forms of musical ambiguity in the great repertoire of the 18th and 19th centuries, beginning with Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, and ending with Mahler and Debussy. The course will look at various kinds of ambiguity: harmonic and tonal, rhythmic and metric, and formal (including phrase ambiguity). Short works (Lieder and miniature piano pieces) will model ambiguity types and larger works, such as single movements from larger multi-movement works, will demonstrate how ambiguity is created and, in many but not all cases, resolved. Some repertory will be chosen based on class instrumentation, and in-class performances will be encouraged as much as possible. (2 credits) Stein  

THYG 567 – 18th- and 19th-Century Forms 
Hearing, Analysis, Performance Aural and score study of thematic and tonal forms in compositions of Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, and Brahms, including binary, ternary, sonata, rondo, cycle, and fantasia designs, using approaches of Schoenberg, Schenker, and others. Historical contexts, theoretical resources, analytical methods, performance concerns. Aural and written homework; readings; semester aural and written exams. (2 credits) Zaritzky  

THYG 569 – Bartok’s String Quartets: Theoretical Traditions and Innovations
The six Bartok String Quartets are a microcosm of the early 20th-century reconception of European musical arts–formal, timbral, tonal, metric, and societal. They likewise represent a “macrocosmos” of Bela Bartok’s increasingly-influential musical legacy. Through a cross-referencing traversal of the quartets, we will review classical European concepts and discover their new Bartokian formulations by means of spectral, tone-set, rhythmic, formal, and proportional ear training and analysis. Weekly theoretical reading, and analytical listening and score study. Comparisons with other Bartok and related works. Ongoing semester project on a student-selected non-quartet Bartok movement or small piece. (2 credits) Zaritzky  

THYG 570 – Bach’s Solo Sonatas, Suites, and Partitas 
The Nature of Unaccompanied Melody Besides string and flute players, for whom Bach specifically composed his “solo” works “senza basso,” virtually every instrumentalist and even vocalist can engage these works in transcription. The course explores this literature, considering how a single melodic part conveys a whole thematic, rhythmic, spatial, timbral, and tonal texture – everything from mono-thematic preludes to polyphonic fugues, with all degrees of textures in between. Exercises in hearing, singing, improvisation, analysis, composition, and performance of Bach (including transcriptions) and of related music by others. Includes monthly graded assignments and a semester project individually selected to engage “unaccompanied” melodic expression within the student’s own repertoire. Project format choices include analysis, composition, transcription, improvisation, or performance-demonstration. (2 credits) Zaritzky  

THYG 572 – Beethoven’s String Quartets
Studies Beethoven’s quartets in light of modern historical research and analytical theory, with attention to their harmonic, contrapuntal, motivic, and structural formation, and the implications of these for understanding and performance. (2 credits) Graybill  

»THYG 573 – German Lied: Analysis and Performance
Examines poetic texts and their musical settings from Schubert to Wolf, with attention to analytic methods and their performance implications. (2 credits) Stein  

THYG 574 – The Music of Schoenberg, Webern and Berg
Study and discussion of various approaches to hearing, analysis, and performance of the seminal atonal and serial music of the Second Viennese School. Emphasis on vocal and instrumental music, such as Schoenberg’s Wind Quintet and String Quartets, Berg’s Violin Concerto and early songs, and Webern’s Concerto for Nine Instruments and later songs. Students may select additional repertoire and may choose analysis, performance, or composition as the focus for a semester project. (2 credits) Faculty  

»THYG 575 – Music Since 1945
Introduces the analysis and understanding of selected composers active since World War II: Carter, Messiaen, Cage, Babbitt, Ligeti, Boulez, and others. Readings and listening; analytical, performance, and/or compositional projects. (2 credits) Miljkovic  

THYG 576 – Ragas and Talas
A close examination of the concepts of raga (melodic mode) and tala (rhythm systems) as a generative grammar for composition and improvisation in North Indian (Hindustani) music. Many types of ragas and talas are analyzed in the context of various performance traditions drawing, in part, from descriptive models developed by Bharatamuni (Natyasastra, c. 200 AD), Vishnu Narayan Bhatkhande (Kramik Pustak Malika, 1954-9), Walter Kaufmann (The Ragas of North India, 1968), and Nazir Jairazbhoy (The Ragas of North Indian Music, 1971). (2 credits) Row  

THYG 577 – The Chamber Music of Johannes Brahms
Studies Brahms’s chamber music, with special attention to formal design, harmonic structure, motivic development, and counterpoint, as well as the implications of these for performance. (2 credits) Graybill  

THYG 578 – Asian Modal Systems
Based, in part, on Harold Powers’ profoundly important contribution to the study of modal concepts, this course explores the nature of modality across and within several musical cultures: Arab, Persian, Indian, Javanese, Chinese and Japanese. The theoretical systems of each culture are studied and are applied analytically to pieces within the repertoire of each culture. (2 credits) Row  

»THYG 581 – Interpretive Analysis I
Analysis for performers; concepts of rhythm, line, harmony, and form; performance implications of analytic conclusions; performance and analysis of works from students’ areas of specialization. (2 credits) Heiss  

»THYG 582 – Interpretive Analysis II
Continuation of THYG 581. (2 credits) Heiss  

THYG 583 – 20th-Century American Composition and Theory
Exploration through analysis, research, listening, and performance of innovative 20th-century American concert music, from Charles Ives to Ruth Crawford through Elliott Carter and John Cage; as well as important theoretical developments connected with American creation (including among others the theories of Charles Seeger, Howard Hanson, Harry Partch, Roger Sessions, and Milton Babbitt). (2 credits) Escot  

THYG 585 – Music of Ghana
Is there a “wrong” way to analyze African music? Kofi Agawu suggests the answer is “No.” Yet, questions arise, both practical and ideological when musicians seek to theorize about African music. In this course, we will explore a number of ways that theorists and ethnomusicologists have sought to describe the music of Africa, and the controversies that surround that work. In particular, we will read the work of people like A.M. Jones, David Locke, James Koetting, Hewitt Pantaleoni, Kobla Ladzekpo, Kofi Agawu, Willie Anku, Kwabena Nketia, David Rycroft, and Gerhard Kubik. Because a consideration of ideas cannot effectively take place in a vacuum, we will engage, through performance, select traditional and contemporary musics created in Ghana, West Africa. We will listen, sing, drum, transcribe, and analyze traditional and contemporary Ghanaian music with our own ears, and eyes, and in our own words. Studies regarding the culture will give us an introductory context. Based on their own perceptions, students will venture theories of their own regarding the music they encounter. (2 credits) Sandler  

THYG 589 – Musical Narrative and Analysis
Explores ways of analyzing a musical work as a narrative structure, with primary focus on instrumental music. We will first consider how a nontexted work can (or cannot) be regarded as a narrative, and then proceed to investigate topics such as musical plot, musical agency, gesture and music, and the role of metaphor in musical discourse. The work for the course includes readings, but the primary emphasis will be on analysis of music from the repertoire. (2 credits) Graybill  

»THYG 694 – Analytical Thesis
Analytical approaches in various styles, periods, or cultures. Supervised in studio instruction; submitted to the Music Theory department. (0 credit) Faculty  

»THYG 695 – Compositional Thesis
Compositional approaches in various styles, periods, or cultures. Supervised in studio instruction; submitted to the Music Theory department. (0 credit) Faculty  

»THYG 697 – Portfolio (first year)
See Music Theory program of study. (0 credit) Faculty  

»THYG 699 – Portfolio (second year)
See Music Theory program of study. (0 credit) Faculty  

»THYG 901 – Doctoral Seminar: Theoretical Practice – Past, Present, Future
Explores major patterns of theoretical thought and practice, and major developments of 20th-century theory. Considers cross-currents between theory, creation, and performance, as well as those between music theory and other domains of human creativity and culture. Theoretical readings and analysis of musical works. (3 credits) Sandler  

»THYG 902 – Doctoral Seminar: Advanced Theoretical Projects
Projects in theoretical research, analysis, historical compositional techniques, or composition that relate to individual interests and needs, and that enhance theoretical technique and knowledge. Two projects in different areas are required, one of which may be a class project. Seminar meetings are devoted to presentations and critiques of individual and class projects. (3 credits) Cogan 

2013-08-19


IT'S LIKE AN ACT OF MURDER; YOU PLAY WITH INTENT TO COMMIT SOMETHING. DUKE ELLINGTON