This session is held at Northeastern University's Fenway Center, adjacent to the NEC campus on Gainsborough Street. Campus map.

Harry Partch (1901–1974), while one of America's best-known maverick composers, is also one of the least performed—mainly due to the one-of-a-kind instruments he created in order to generate the sounds his music demanded. The instruments themselves are difficult to transport, and they require performers with specialized knowledge of how Partch intended them to be used.

This week during a symposium and festival, co-hosted by New England Conservatory and Northeastern University, many of Partch's instruments will travel from New Jersey to NEC's Jordan Hall, with the help of their custodian, Dean Drummond. Visitors will be able to examine them and hear them used in concert. Scholars will gather to explore the continuing impact of Partch’s work, with a combination of academic conference sessions, interactive workshops, and concert performances housed at both NEC and Northeastern.

Extensions of the Spirit

The symposium and festival conclude with tonight's concert, which features music by living composers who have responded to Partch's sound world and ideas.

A half-hour talk with symposium participants is immediately followed by the performance.

Brian Robison Aurora corporealis for theremin and electronics
Georg Hajdu Re: Guitar for guitar solo
Katarina Miljkovic new work for violin and electronics
Manfred Stahnke Diamantenpracht for harp solo
Hubert Ho new work for violin and guitar
Julia Werntz Group Dance for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, and percussion

Tickets are free and will be available at the door.

Date: September 21, 2012 - 7:30:PM
Price: Free
Location: Fenway Center, Northeastern University

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NEC's FREE concerts do not require a ticket, unless stated in concert listing.
Unreserved seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.
Doors open 30 minutes prior to the concert's start time.


SOMETIMES IT'S TO YOUR ADVANTAGE FOR PEOPLE TO THINK YOU'RE CRAZY. THELONIOUS MONK