Generally, students are awarded one credit for each hour of class time.
Exceptions are made for studio, ensemble, and a small number of classes.
For complete information as to courses offered in the current year, students
should consult the schedule of course offerings available each semester in the
Registrar’s Office. Courses numbered 100 through 499 are undergraduate
level; courses numbered 500 through 999 are graduate level. Course numbers
preceded by a “»” are typically offered each academic year. Course numbers
followed by a “T” are taught to mixed classes of undergraduates and graduates.
Undergraduate students may register for graduate-level courses with the
instructor’s permission. Courses followed by a “*” are repeatable for credit.
Courses followed by a “**” are repeatable for credit if the topic has changed
(permission from Academic Advisor required).

CONTEMPORARY IMPROVISATION

Undergraduate Curriculum

»CI 181T – Development of Long-Term Melodic Memory
Aural training through memorization of melodies and bass lines from diverse musical sources, including music from African-American, Greek, and Spanish traditions. Develops interval recognition and understanding of harmonic implications. (2 credits) Blake  

»CI 283T – Advanced Aural Training
Study of 20th-century music with emphasis on advanced ear training, recognition of vertical structures up to thirteenth chords, swing and bebop phrasing and improvisation, as well as advanced transcription skills. Prerequisite: JS 263 or instructor’s permission. (2 credits) Netsky  

»CI 284T – Development of Long-Term Harmonic Memory
Continuation of CI 283T. Examination of non-diatonic chord progressions. Skill building and creativity will be emphasized through the study of triads with irregular root motion. Students will apply topics learned in class through compositional assignments. Prerequisite: CI 283T. (2 credits) Blake  

»CI 385T – Development of Personal Style
Compositional and improvisational models and visual imagery are used as an inspiration for creative musical projects. Prerequisite: CI 283T or instructor’s permission. (2 credits) Blake  

»CI 386T – Development of Personal Style
Focuses on specific pieces that will be used as a basis for original compositions. The curriculum will consist of several discrete units including the following: composition with restricted pitch sets, time as a parameter, extended tonality and re-composition. Prerequisite: CI 283T or instructor’s permission. (2 credits) Coleman 

CI 451T – Issues and Trends in American Music
Through presentations from many voices within and outside the conservatory, readings and group discussions, the class will explore the dimensions of American music, learn something about various streams of musical activity in America, attempt to understand what is “American” about American music, consider the impact of regional and ethnic musical subcultures and “world music,” grapple with the potential impact of technology, and consider today’s trends as indicators of the future. (2 credits) Coleman  

CI 455T – The Properties of Free Music
Examines the non-harmony based materials that are consistently used and redefined by improvising musicians. Includes the study of several seminal methodologies (Unit Structures, Tri-Axiom theory and European Free Improvisation) with the focus on how they inform individual and group improvisation. Students will perform in class, compose short pieces – some with text descriptions – and create graphic scores. (2 credits) Morris  

CI 456T – Survey/Lab of West African Music
Explores selected practices of four West African music traditions: that of the Ewe and Dagomba people of Ghana and the griot traditions of Burkina Faso. Students will study drum vocables, instrumentation and songs with an emphasis on concepts of off-beat timing, binary and ternary rhythms and cross-rhythms. Audio and video recordings and the reading of selected studies by fieldworkers supplement class work. Includes hands-on playing of traditional instruments, contemporary applications of repertoire to Western instruments and an overview of Afro-Pop from King sunny Ade, Ali Farke Touré to Salif Keita. (2 credits) Leake  

CI 461T – Eastern European Jewish Music Traditions
Introduces various types of Jewish music that flourished in Eastern Europe and the Americas. Surveys such styles as folk, theater, cantorial, Hassidic, and klezmer. Individual and group performance projects.
(2 credits) Netsky  

»CI 464T – Film Noir
Introduces such post–World War II themes as victimization and character. Attention is given to film music; students create their own music based on plot, theme, and character. Film viewing required outside of class. Films: Spiral Staircase, etc. Film choices will not necessarily be limited to those in the classic film noir genre. (2 credits) Blake  

»CI 466T – Film Noir II
Continuation of CI 464T. Prerequisite: CI 464T (2 credits) Blake  

CI 468T – Music, Spirit and Transformation
This course explores the concept of transformation and transcendence through music by examining its use and purpose in various world cultures and religions. The desire to connect spiritually through music is virtually universal, but music also communicates that which is beyond language in both sacred and secular settings. We will explore the idea that music is powerful and expand our definitions of sacred and spirit. Through guided listening to recordings of music from around the world, viewing documentaries, class discussions, and interdisciplinary projects we will explore the forms and contexts of music from around the world and make connections between music, transformation and spirituality. (2 credits) Chase  

»CI 487T – Seminar in Performance
Focuses on developing and expanding students’ artistic sensibility through performance and discussion. Integrates advanced aural, theoretical, compositional and performance skills into individual aesthetics. Provides insights into concert preparation, career strategies, and development of repertoire. Recommended for students in their final semester, in preparation for their degree recitals. (2 credits) Bergonzi  

»CI 488T – Seminar in Performance
See course description for CI 487T. (2 credits) Blake 

Graduate Curriculum

»CI 057 – Graduate Third-Stream Ear Training
Builds the aural skills required for graduate-level study in Contemporary Improvisation, including perception, recognition, and recall of melodic and harmonic intervals, chords, chord progressions, rhythms, and melodic interpretation and expression. Students develop melodic understanding and memory by learning diverse music from recordings without the aid of notation, using voices and instruments. (0 credit) Netsky  

»CI 517T – Development of Long-Term Melodic Memory
Aural training through memorization of melodies and bass lines from diverse musical sources, including music from African-American, Greek, and Spanish traditions. Develops interval recognition and understanding of harmonic implications. (2 credits) Blake  

CI 551T – Issues and Trends in American Music
Through presentations from many voices within and outside the conservatory, readings and group discussions, the class will explore the dimensions of American music, learn something about various streams of musical activity in America, attempt to understand what is “American” about American music, consider the impact of regional and ethnic musical subcultures and “world music,” grapple with the potential impact of technology, and consider today’s trends as indicators of the future. (2 credits) Coleman  

CI 553 – Open Forms, Graphic Scores and Structured Improvisation
This class will explore the links and differences between the Open Form scores that emerged out of the post-Cagean world of the ’50s and ’60s and the Controlled Improvisation strategies that many composer-performers who come from the worlds of Jazz and Free Improvisation have utilized. This class will combine historical and theoretical perspectives; many of the challenges inherent in looking at these two approaches to music together were raised in Composer/Performer/Educator George Lewis’ essay “Improvised Music after 1950: Afrological and Eurological Perspectives.” (Black Music Research Journal, Vol. 16, No. 1, Spring 1996) and this will function as a key text, as will John Cage’s “Writings on Indeterminacy.” Composers studied will include John Cage, Earle Brown, Christian Wolff, Cornelius Cardew, Stockhausen, Alvin Lucier, Anthony Braxton, Roscoe Mitchell, Wadada Leo Smith, John Zorn and others. In-class performance will be a crucial part of the class, with an eventual goal of at least one public performance. (2 credits) Coleman  

CI 555T – The Properties of Free Music
Graduate offering of CI 455T. (2 credits) Morris  

CI 556T – Survey/Lab of West African Music
Graduate offering of CI 456T. (2 credits) Leake  

CI 561T – Eastern European Jewish Music Performance Traditions
Introduces various types of Jewish music that flourished in Eastern Europe and the Americas. Surveys such styles as folk, theater, cantorial, Hassidic, and klezmer. Individual and group performance projects.
(2 credits) Netsky  

»CI 564T – Film Noir
Graduate offering of CI 464T. (2 credits) Blake  

»CI 566T – Film Noir II
Continuation of CI 564T. Prerequisite: CI 564T. (2 credits) Blake  

CI 568T – Music, Spirit and Transformation
Graduate offering of CI 468T. (2 credits) Chase  

»CI 571 – Third-Stream Methodology
A four-semester series of seminars required of Contemporary Improvisation majors enrolled in our Masters and Graduate Diploma programs. This course will focus on readings relevant to the study of contemporary improvisation and on related musical projects. (2 credits) Eade  

»CI 572 – Third-Stream Methodology Composition projects based on Western models. (2 credits) Netsky  

»CI 583T – Advanced Aural Training
Study of 20th-century music with emphasis on advanced ear training, recognition of vertical structures up to thirteenth chords, swing and bebop phrasing and improvisation, as well as advanced transcription skills. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission required for non-majors. (2 credits) Netsky  

»CI 584T – Development of Long-Term Harmonic Memory
Continuation of CI 583T. Examination of non-diatonic chord progressions. Skill building and creativity will be emphasized through the study of triads with irregular root motion. Students will apply topics learned in class through compositional assignments. Prerequisite: CI 583T. (2 credits) Blake  

»CI 585T – Development of Personal Style
Compositional and improvisational models and visual imagery are used as an inspiration for creative musical projects. (2 credits) Blake  

»CI 586T – Development of Personal Style
Focuses on specific pieces that will be used as a basis for original compositions. The curriculum will consist of several discrete units including the following: composition with restricted pitch sets, time as a parameter, extended tonality and re-composition. (2 credits) Coleman  

»CI 587T – Seminar in Performance
Graduate offering of CI 487T. (2 credits) Bergonzi  

»CI 588T – Seminar in Performance
Graduate offering of CI 488T. (2 credits) Blake  

»CI 671 – Third-Stream Methodology
Studies in contemporary improvisational techniques. (2 credits) Coleman  

»CI 672 – Third-Stream Methodology
Composition projects based on non-Western models. (2 credits) Row 

2013-08-19


MUSIC IS THE SILENCE BETWEEN THE NOTES. CLAUDE DEBUSSY